BLACK WOMAN



I’m excited for this week’s post. It revolves around the birth of the girl child and how people relate to it.
In the olden days, when a girl child is born, it is seen as a burden and a heartache. Women were casted out from their homes for birthing female children. Men with too many female children were seen as weak and not man enough. But why? Is it because the physical attributes of a woman makes her weak? Or is it because as women we are more emotionally fragile?
In recent centuries, it is still the same. A man warns his wife sternly “give me a male child or I'll send you back to your father’s house”
I once heard an eye witness testify of an experience where a medical doctor, threw his wife out of the house for giving birth to girls. I’m no doctor or anything but isn’t the male the one who determines the sex of a child. That’s biology 101.
What these people fail to realize is the wealth and blessings they get from bringing a female child into the world.  Let me break it down;
A female child is not just to partner up with her mother to sit in the kitchen and prepare meals daily , but she also is a nurturer. Right from her childhood she is the one that smiles with her mother while the heat emanates from the stove. It is she who rubs her father’s back after a long day of work.  Yet the foolish ones shun her for not being a male.
A female child is the diplomat. As a teenager,  she witnesses the strain in the love between her parents. She lightens the mood, serving them meals together, turning on the channel to old movies, reminding them of their youthful days in a bid to keep the love alive. That’s a female child.
A female child becomes a woman and  watches wrinkles grow on the old faces of her parents. She goes to work in the early hours of the morning and comes back late at night to make sure they are taken care of, she protects herself and her home from the monsters on the street.
A female child watches the light fade out from the eyes of her parents, she sheds tears but knows they are happy and it’s where they belong. She strives harder now to make them proud; she guards herself from all those players on the street who think they can woo her with sweet words and material things. She keeps her head high as she keeps breaking all the barriers, she’s on top. She makes a name for her parents.
A female child is not to be ashamed of because she is not as physically strong as the male. She is not to hide her chest in shame. She is not to cover her small waist when she walks by. She is not to look down at her feet as she climbs the steps.
We are emotionally strong!
 we are wise!
We are brave!
We are African women!
 I employ you to embrace that.
Aisha is a young writer. She writes to promote everything about the African woman. And hopes to bring glory to the continent.

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